Eros, Orpheus and “On the Origin of the World” ~ Alexander Rivera

From the Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition No 25, Vol. 3. Autumnal Equinox 2013 http://www.jwmt.org/v3n25/rivera.html

 

Introduction

On the Origin of the World (Codex II) of the Nag Hammadi Library, is dominated by a compendium of influences including Manichean, Valentinian, Sethian, Ophite, Egyptian, Hermetic (Pagan Gnosis), Jewish apocalyptic apocrypha (Enoch and Jubilees), magic and astrology, and last but not least, and as the primary focus of this paper, the Orphic and Hellenistic mysteries. Yet, despite the variety of different influences, it still retains a particular Gnostic flavor—written persuasively as an academic essay, to not only attract potential adherents to the Gnostic religion but also to defend the Gnostic world-view in a distanced and factual manner. These references and allusions to other, non-Gnostic works, are employed to lend weight to the author’s message. Because of the juxtaposition of eclectic influences and even the citation of other texts, which are now lost to us, they seem to point to a school in Alexandria, Egypt as a place of origination……. cont’d at the link above.

Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden – Alex Rivera

In five parts:

 

Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 1)
Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 2)
Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 3)
Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 4)
Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 5)

Where Do Demons Come From? ~ Michael S Heiser

https://blog.logos.com/2015/10/where-do-demons-come-from/

Excerpt:

Everyone familiar with the Bible knows it talks about angels and demons. But most would be surprised to learn that there’s no verse in the Bible that explains where demons came from. Christians typically assume that demons are fallen angels, cast from heaven with Satan (the Devil) right before the temptation of Adam and Eve. But guess what? There’s no such story in the Bible. The only description of anything like that is in Revelation 12:9—but the occasion for that whole episode was the birth of the messiah (Rev 12:4-6), an event long after Adam and Eve. The idea of a primeval fall of angels actually comes from church tradition and the great English poet John Milton in his epic Paradise Lost.

Continued at the link above