Excerpt from Robert Burns – “To a Louse”

O wad some Power the giftie gie us
To see oursels as ithers see us!
It wad frae monie a blunder free us,
An’ foolish notion:
What airs in dress an’ gait wad lea’e us,
An’ ev’n devotion!

Translation

O would some Power the small gift give us

To see ourselves as others see us!

It would for many a blunder free us,

And foolish notion:

What airs in dress and gait would leave us

And even devotion!

Ptolemaeus: Letter to Flora (Timothy Pettipiece – Academia.edu)

http://www.academia.edu/4229453/Ptolemaeus_Letter_to_Flora

available to read on-line or download as pdf

This is the “Flora” referenced here:

https://think-and-discern.com/2015/03/03/the-demiurge-in-valentinianism-from-the-gnosis-org-library/

also available to read here without the commentary

http://www.gnosis.org/library/flora.htm?PHPSESSID=9c5b539e658491ca6cb7ceff7d83b12a

Leisure ~ WH Davies

Leisure

WHAT is this life if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare?

No time to stand beneath the boughs,
And stare as long as sheep and cows:

No time to see, when woods we pass,
Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass:

No time to see, in broad daylight,
Streams full of stars, like skies at night:

No time to turn at Beauty’s glance,
And watch her feet, how they can dance:

No time to wait till her mouth can
Enrich that smile her eyes began?

A poor life this if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.

🙂

“Nature” is what we see ~ Emily Dickinson

“Nature” is what we see—
The Hill—the Afternoon—
Squirrel—Eclipse— the Bumble bee—
Nay—Nature is Heaven—
Nature is what we hear—
The Bobolink—the Sea—
Thunder—the Cricket—
Nay—Nature is Harmony—
Nature is what we know—
Yet have no art to say—
So impotent Our Wisdom is
To her Simplicity.

The Demiurge in Valentinianism ~ from the Gnosis.org Library

http://www.gnosis.org/library/valentinus/Demiurge.htm

Introduction

Valentinus founded a school of speculative Christian theology in the second century AD. Because he and his followers drew a distinction between the true God and the creator of the world, they are classified by modern scholars as “Gnostics”. In common with other Gnostics, they believed that the material world was created by a lesser deity which they call the Demiurge (literally “public craftsman”).

However, the Demiurge in Valentinianism is quite different in character from the hostile creator figure familiar from other schools of Gnosticism. In the Sethian school, for example, the Demiurge is a hostile demonic force who creates the material world in order to trap the spiritual elements. In contrast, Valentinians “show a relatively positive attitude towards the craftsman of the world or god of Israel” (Layton 1987). Valentinians insisted that while the Demiurge may be a bit foolish, he certainly could not be considered evil. Instead, he has a role to play in the process of redemption.

The Valentinian teacher Ptolemy strongly criticizes non-Valentinian Gnostics who taught that the Demiurge was evil. In his view, those who view the creator as evil “do not comprehend what was said by the Savior…Only thoughtless people have this idea, people who do not recognize the providence of the creator and so are blind not only the eye of the soul but even in the eye of the body” (Letter to Flora 3:2-6). They are as “completely in error” as orthodox Christians who taught that the Demiurge was the highest God (Letter to Flora 3:2).

In contrast, he and other Valentinians steadfastly maintained that “the creation is not due to a god who corrupts but to one who is just and hates evil” (Letter to Flora 3:6). He carefully distinguished the Demiurge from both God and the Devil. According to Ptolemy, “he is essentially different from these two (God and the Devil) and is between them, he is rightly given the name, Middle” (Letter to Flora 7:4). He is “neither good nor evil and unjust, can properly be called just , since he is the arbitrator of the justice which depends on him” (Letter to Flora 7:5).

In his excellent book on Gnosticism, Giovanni Filoramo (1990) compares the negative portrayal of the Demiurge in the Sethian school with the more positive Valentinian view:

The image of Demiurge usually portrayed in the Sethian texts is negative. Apart from anti-Jewish and anti-Christian polemic there are some internal reasons for this, specifically the function of the psychic (soul) element represented by the Demiurge. This element is not, as for Valentinians and other Christian Gnostics, the seat of free will, but a moment (that of animation) in the hylic dimension and, like it, destined to perdition. This is the radical difference from the Valentinian Demiurge, the latter being a representative of the psychic element that is also called upon to participate in the work of salvation. Devoid of scarifying characteristics, Ptolemy’s Demiurge is simply the Creator of the Seven Heavens, who lives above them (Filoramo 1990)

Filoramo links the more positive view of the Demiurge in the Valentinianism to the relatively positive of the soul substance (psyche) of which he is formed. It would seem that in order to understand the teaching on the Demiurge, it is necessary to have at least a basic understanding of the Valentinian teaching on the soul (psyche) and its position within the overall structure of the cosmos.

 

(continue reading at the above link)

Content authored by David Brons

Oysters ~ Beware the Walrus ~ postflaviana.org

http://postflaviana.org/warning-oysters-beware-walrus/

For many in the ‘Baby Boomer’ generation, the Beatles were not just a fantastically popular band, but a symbolic representation of what was best about the era of their youth. The Beatles stood for Love, and Freedom, and Peace; and they stood against the extremes of the Cold War; that is, for common sense as opposed to either extreme Communism or mindless consumerism and capitalism. The Beatles were the polar opposite of Lyndon Johnson, and Richard Nixon; they were the quintessential voice of the civil rights movement, and the anti-war movement, and the Woodstock Generation (even though they had officially disbanded before Woodstock took place.)

However, even in their heyday, not everyone was equally impressed with the Beatles. Some were distressed by their rejection of Christianity, and their openly expressed alliance with Eastern religions. The Beatles’ work was also widely interpreted as encouraging the use of dangerous and addictive drugs, much to the dismay of the wiser & more socially prudent parents of the “flower children”.

Today, the debate rages on, as fundamentalist Christians (in particular) have increasingly noticed occult and even Luciferian messages in the Beatles’ music and imagery. While we see this primarily as a contrived false dialectic pitting fundamentalist Christianity (a bankrupt religious relic) against Satanism (another bankrupt fundamentalism), our purpose in writing this blog post is to look more deeply into the true purposes and the true alliances that the Beatles brought to the table.

read on at the link above 🙂

The Walrus and the Carpenter ~ Lewis Carroll

“The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright —
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no business to be there
After the day was done —
“It’s very rude of him,” she said,
“To come and spoil the fun.”

The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry.
You could not see a cloud, because
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying overhead —
There were no birds to fly.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Were walking close at hand;
They wept like anything to see
Such quantities of sand:
If this were only cleared away,’
They said, it would be grand!’

If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year,
Do you suppose,’ the Walrus said,
That they could get it clear?’
I doubt it,’ said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.

O Oysters, come and walk with us!’
The Walrus did beseech.
A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,
Along the briny beach:
We cannot do with more than four,
To give a hand to each.’

The eldest Oyster looked at him,
But never a word he said:
The eldest Oyster winked his eye,
And shook his heavy head —
Meaning to say he did not choose
To leave the oyster-bed.

But four young Oysters hurried up,
All eager for the treat:
Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,
Their shoes were clean and neat —
And this was odd, because, you know,
They hadn’t any feet.

Four other Oysters followed them,
And yet another four;
And thick and fast they came at last,
And more, and more, and more —
All hopping through the frothy waves,
And scrambling to the shore.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Walked on a mile or so,
And then they rested on a rock
Conveniently low:
And all the little Oysters stood
And waited in a row.

The time has come,’ the Walrus said,
To talk of many things:
Of shoes — and ships — and sealing-wax —
Of cabbages — and kings —
And why the sea is boiling hot —
And whether pigs have wings.’
But wait a bit,’ the Oysters cried,
Before we have our chat;
For some of us are out of breath,
And all of us are fat!’
No hurry!’ said the Carpenter.
They thanked him much for that.

A loaf of bread,’ the Walrus said,
Is what we chiefly need:
Pepper and vinegar besides
Are very good indeed —
Now if you’re ready, Oysters dear,
We can begin to feed.’

But not on us!’ the Oysters cried,
Turning a little blue.
After such kindness, that would be
A dismal thing to do!’
The night is fine,’ the Walrus said.
Do you admire the view?

It was so kind of you to come!
And you are very nice!’
The Carpenter said nothing but
Cut us another slice:
I wish you were not quite so deaf —
I’ve had to ask you twice!’

It seems a shame,’ the Walrus said,
To play them such a trick,
After we’ve brought them out so far,
And made them trot so quick!’
The Carpenter said nothing but
The butter’s spread too thick!’

I weep for you,’ the Walrus said:
I deeply sympathize.’
With sobs and tears he sorted out
Those of the largest size,
Holding his pocket-handkerchief
Before his streaming eyes.

O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,
You’ve had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?’
But answer came there none —
And this was scarcely odd, because
They’d eaten every one.”

The Mysteries of the Samothracian Kabiri ~ Steiner Archives

Mystery Centres

Schmidt Number: S-5513

On-line since: 10th November, 2004

LECTURE XII.
THE MYSTERIES OF THE SAMOTHRACIAN KABIRI
Dornach, 21st December, 1923.
IN the course of the last few weeks I have drawn your attention to many different kinds of Mysteries, and we have especially attempted to obtain an insight into those Mysteries which were, so to say, the last of the great Mysteries which connected man s inner being directly with the life of nature, with the spirit of nature. These were the Mysteries of Hibernia; and we have seen how, through insight into man himself, an insight which was, however, of an intimate spiritual as well as an individual personal nature, the Mysteries of Greece also penetrated into the inner being of man. One can indeed say that as in the world of external nature the different regions of the earth bring forth this or that kind of vegetation, so in the course of human evolution there streamed down into the different regions of the earth the most manifold influences from the spiritual world, and these worked upon mankind.
If we were to pass over to the East, the Orient — as we are to do shortly in a historical connection — we should find there many other kinds of Mysteries; but today, as all our visitors are not yet present with us, I will link on rather to what we have already studied in preference to beginning something new.
If we look back at the course of human evolution, we may say that there appears before our Imaginative consciousness, with all possible clearness, a threefold evolution. I say “before our Imaginative consciousness,” because of course if we extend those epochs of which I am now speaking further back still, towards still earlier times, we naturally get a greater number than three, and this is also the case if we go further on into the future; but we will today take these middle stages of human evolution, which appear not through Inspiration but already in all clearness before our Imagination; these we will place before our souls today and study them from one particular point of view.
Now, even down to the Egyptian time it was still the case for humanity that, as regards the consciousness of that time — and this applies to the African and European races as well as to the Asiatic races — what we today call matter simply did not exist. Human consciousness did not even grasp the external coarse substances, let alone those abstractions which we today describe as carbon, hydrogen, sulphur, and so on. These things simply did not exist for them; but everything which was spread out externally in nature was seen directly as the body of divine spiritual beings, who revealed themselves in the whole of nature. Today we can go out into the mountains, we can tread on the rocks, we can even throw stones, and all these things we regard as indifferent neutral substances. In our consciousness today there is nothing in any way similar to what was in the consciousness of the ancient, Egyptian or the ancient Oriental.
– See more at: http://wn.rsarchive.org/Lectures/GA232/English/GC1985/19231221p01.html#sthash.FBgXz9Ar.dpuf

“Love is Immortal”

Before the sublime mystery of life and spirit,

the mystery of infinite space and endless time,

we stand in reverent awe…

This much we know: we are at one phase of the immortality of life.

The mighty stream of life flows on, and, in this mighty stream, we too flow on…

not lost…

but each eternally significant.

For this I feel: The spirit never betrays the person who trusts it.

Physical life may be defeated but life goes on;

character survives,

goodness lives and love is immortal.

Colonel Robert G Ingersoll,  (1833 – 1899)

See also “The Blasphemer Robert G Ingersoll”

http://donswaim.com/bierce-ingersoll.html

Hope ~ Emily Dickinson [1830-1886]

Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul,
And sings the tune without the words,
And never stops at all,

And sweetest in the gale is heard;
And sore must be the storm
That could abash the little bird
That kept so many warm.

I’ve heard it in the chillest land,
And on the strangest sea;
Yet, never, in extremity,
It asked a crumb of me.