Gnosis and Christianity: Jesus-Logos-Christos

THEOSOPHY, Vol. 56, No. 11, September, 1968
(Pages 334-344; Size: 32K)
(Number 11 of a 36-part series)
THE CHRISTIAN SCHEME(4)

GNOSIS AND CHRISTIANITY: Jesus-Logos-Christos

http://www.wisdomworld.org/additional/christianity/Jesus-Logos-Christos.html

Entheogens: What’s in a Name? ~ Gnostic Media

The Untold History of Psychedelic Spirituality, Social Control and the CIA

 

http://www.gnosticmedia.com/Entheogens_WhatsinaName_PsychedelicSpirituality_SocialControl_CIA

Link for pdf

http://www.gnosticmedia.com/txtfiles/Entheogens_WhatsInAName_by_JanIrvin_draft_v.3.5_Nov20.pdf

Ptolemaeus: Letter to Flora (Timothy Pettipiece – Academia.edu)

http://www.academia.edu/4229453/Ptolemaeus_Letter_to_Flora

available to read on-line or download as pdf

This is the “Flora” referenced here:

https://think-and-discern.com/2015/03/03/the-demiurge-in-valentinianism-from-the-gnosis-org-library/

also available to read here without the commentary

http://www.gnosis.org/library/flora.htm?PHPSESSID=9c5b539e658491ca6cb7ceff7d83b12a

The Demiurge in Valentinianism ~ from the Gnosis.org Library

http://www.gnosis.org/library/valentinus/Demiurge.htm

Introduction

Valentinus founded a school of speculative Christian theology in the second century AD. Because he and his followers drew a distinction between the true God and the creator of the world, they are classified by modern scholars as “Gnostics”. In common with other Gnostics, they believed that the material world was created by a lesser deity which they call the Demiurge (literally “public craftsman”).

However, the Demiurge in Valentinianism is quite different in character from the hostile creator figure familiar from other schools of Gnosticism. In the Sethian school, for example, the Demiurge is a hostile demonic force who creates the material world in order to trap the spiritual elements. In contrast, Valentinians “show a relatively positive attitude towards the craftsman of the world or god of Israel” (Layton 1987). Valentinians insisted that while the Demiurge may be a bit foolish, he certainly could not be considered evil. Instead, he has a role to play in the process of redemption.

The Valentinian teacher Ptolemy strongly criticizes non-Valentinian Gnostics who taught that the Demiurge was evil. In his view, those who view the creator as evil “do not comprehend what was said by the Savior…Only thoughtless people have this idea, people who do not recognize the providence of the creator and so are blind not only the eye of the soul but even in the eye of the body” (Letter to Flora 3:2-6). They are as “completely in error” as orthodox Christians who taught that the Demiurge was the highest God (Letter to Flora 3:2).

In contrast, he and other Valentinians steadfastly maintained that “the creation is not due to a god who corrupts but to one who is just and hates evil” (Letter to Flora 3:6). He carefully distinguished the Demiurge from both God and the Devil. According to Ptolemy, “he is essentially different from these two (God and the Devil) and is between them, he is rightly given the name, Middle” (Letter to Flora 7:4). He is “neither good nor evil and unjust, can properly be called just , since he is the arbitrator of the justice which depends on him” (Letter to Flora 7:5).

In his excellent book on Gnosticism, Giovanni Filoramo (1990) compares the negative portrayal of the Demiurge in the Sethian school with the more positive Valentinian view:

The image of Demiurge usually portrayed in the Sethian texts is negative. Apart from anti-Jewish and anti-Christian polemic there are some internal reasons for this, specifically the function of the psychic (soul) element represented by the Demiurge. This element is not, as for Valentinians and other Christian Gnostics, the seat of free will, but a moment (that of animation) in the hylic dimension and, like it, destined to perdition. This is the radical difference from the Valentinian Demiurge, the latter being a representative of the psychic element that is also called upon to participate in the work of salvation. Devoid of scarifying characteristics, Ptolemy’s Demiurge is simply the Creator of the Seven Heavens, who lives above them (Filoramo 1990)

Filoramo links the more positive view of the Demiurge in the Valentinianism to the relatively positive of the soul substance (psyche) of which he is formed. It would seem that in order to understand the teaching on the Demiurge, it is necessary to have at least a basic understanding of the Valentinian teaching on the soul (psyche) and its position within the overall structure of the cosmos.

 

(continue reading at the above link)

Content authored by David Brons

The Mysteries of the Samothracian Kabiri ~ Steiner Archives

Mystery Centres

Schmidt Number: S-5513

On-line since: 10th November, 2004

LECTURE XII.
THE MYSTERIES OF THE SAMOTHRACIAN KABIRI
Dornach, 21st December, 1923.
IN the course of the last few weeks I have drawn your attention to many different kinds of Mysteries, and we have especially attempted to obtain an insight into those Mysteries which were, so to say, the last of the great Mysteries which connected man s inner being directly with the life of nature, with the spirit of nature. These were the Mysteries of Hibernia; and we have seen how, through insight into man himself, an insight which was, however, of an intimate spiritual as well as an individual personal nature, the Mysteries of Greece also penetrated into the inner being of man. One can indeed say that as in the world of external nature the different regions of the earth bring forth this or that kind of vegetation, so in the course of human evolution there streamed down into the different regions of the earth the most manifold influences from the spiritual world, and these worked upon mankind.
If we were to pass over to the East, the Orient — as we are to do shortly in a historical connection — we should find there many other kinds of Mysteries; but today, as all our visitors are not yet present with us, I will link on rather to what we have already studied in preference to beginning something new.
If we look back at the course of human evolution, we may say that there appears before our Imaginative consciousness, with all possible clearness, a threefold evolution. I say “before our Imaginative consciousness,” because of course if we extend those epochs of which I am now speaking further back still, towards still earlier times, we naturally get a greater number than three, and this is also the case if we go further on into the future; but we will today take these middle stages of human evolution, which appear not through Inspiration but already in all clearness before our Imagination; these we will place before our souls today and study them from one particular point of view.
Now, even down to the Egyptian time it was still the case for humanity that, as regards the consciousness of that time — and this applies to the African and European races as well as to the Asiatic races — what we today call matter simply did not exist. Human consciousness did not even grasp the external coarse substances, let alone those abstractions which we today describe as carbon, hydrogen, sulphur, and so on. These things simply did not exist for them; but everything which was spread out externally in nature was seen directly as the body of divine spiritual beings, who revealed themselves in the whole of nature. Today we can go out into the mountains, we can tread on the rocks, we can even throw stones, and all these things we regard as indifferent neutral substances. In our consciousness today there is nothing in any way similar to what was in the consciousness of the ancient, Egyptian or the ancient Oriental.
– See more at: http://wn.rsarchive.org/Lectures/GA232/English/GC1985/19231221p01.html#sthash.FBgXz9Ar.dpuf