Barbelo:The Story of Jesus Christ by Riaan Booysen pdf

click the images to enlarge

https://www.riaanbooysen.com/images/downloads/Barbelo-RiaanBooysen.pdf

Related “A Simonian Origin for Christianity” – by Roger Parvus

To comply with the wishes of  vridar

…please make it clear that I may not personally endorse other views on the site or blog where it is posted.

See also “The Great Declaration of Simon Magus” Introduction and Translation by Robert Price at thegodabovegod.com

Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden – Alex Rivera

In five parts:

 

Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 1)
Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 2)
Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 3)
Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 4)
Forbidden Fruit in the Midst of the Garden (Part 5)

Valentinus: A Gnostic for All Seasons ~ Stephan A Hoeller

VALENTINUS

A Gnostic for All Seasons

by Stephan A. Hoeller

Excerpt from the article:

The proposition that the human mind lives in a largely self-created world of illusion from whence only the enlightenment of a kind of Gnosis can rescue it finds powerful analogues in the two great religions of the East, i.e., Hinduism and Buddhism. The following statement from the Upanishads could easily have been written by Valentinus or another Gnostic: “This (world) is God’s Maya, through which he deceives himself.” According to the teachings of Buddha, the world of apparent reality consists of ignorance, impermanence, and the lack of authentic selfhood. Valentinus is in very good company indeed when he establishes the proposition of the wrong system of false reality that can be set aright by the human spirit.

Read full article here:

http://www.gnosis.org/valentinus.htm

Amazing Myths and Legends Blogspot – Archons

 

Archon (Gr. ἄρχων, pl. ἄρχοντες) is a Greek word that means “ruler” or “lord,” frequently used as the title of a specific public office. It is the masculine present participle of the verb stem ἀρχ-, meaning “to rule,” derived from the same root as monarch, hierarchy, and anarchy.

Ancient Greece
In ancient Greece the chief magistrate in various Greek city states was called Archon. The term was also used throughout Greek history in a more general sense, ranging from “club leader” to “master of the tables” at syssitia.
In Athens a system of nine concurrent Archons evolved, led by three respective remits over the civic, military, and religious affairs of the state: the three office holders being known as the Eponymos archon (Ἐπώνυμος ἄρχων; the “name” ruler, who gave his name to the year in which he held office), the Polemarch (“war ruler”), and the Archon Basileus (“king ruler”). The six others were the Thesmothétai, Judicial Officers. Originally these offices were filled from the wealthier classes by elections every ten years. During this period the eponymous Archon was the chief magistrate, the Polemarch was the head of the armed forces, and the Archon Basileus was responsible for some civic religious arrangements, and for the supervision of some major trials in the law courts. After 683 BC the offices were held for only a single year, and the year was named after the Archōn Epōnymos. (Many ancient calendar systems did not number their years consecutively.)
After 487 BC the archonships were assigned by lot to any citizen and the Polemarch’s military duties were taken over by new class of generals known as stratēgoí. The ten stratēgoí (one per tribe) were elected, and the office of Polemarch was rotated among them on a daily basis. The Polemarch thereafter had only minor religious duties, and the titular headship over the strategoi. The Archon Eponymos remained the titular head of state under democracy, though of much reduced political importance. The Archons were assisted by “junior” archons, called Thesmothétai (Θεσμοθέται “Institutors”). After 457 BC ex-archons were automatically enrolled as life members of the Areopagus, though that assembly was no longer extremely important politically at that time. (See Archons of Athens.)………cont’d at the link

Lots more fascinating stuff at that blog.

Johannites

http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Post/464249

What is a Johannite? Are they representatives of a continuous tradition that began with John the Baptist? Are they instead a group that began at a later date spontaneously as did the Mormons? Are there actually both or several types of Johannites? What do they believe? Do they think that the Baptist was Christ and Jesus was not? Do they believe that they were both Christs? Do they believe that John the Baptist was something more like a prophet or an apostle? Are there a range of different beliefs among different Johannite groups?
In general I think we can define Johannites as people who disagree with the Christian mainstream about the importance of John the Baptist. As to when they began or what they believe we need historical references.

cont’d at the link above